annoytheleft

Posts Tagged ‘health care’

Dem Health Legislation Torpedoes Low Cost Student Health Plans

In health care on August 24, 2010 at 9:32 pm

Told ya so.

Without a number of changes, it may be impossible to continue to offer student health plans, says a letter that the American Council on Education sent Aug. 12 to Health and Human Services Secretary Kathleen Sebelius…

This is what happens when you pass intrusive legislation without reading it. Let the wild rumpus of unintended consequences start!

Democrat Senator Admits Obamacare ‘Folly’

In Democrat, health care on March 30, 2010 at 4:02 pm

Marching in lock-step with the party has it's consequences

Before even buyer’s remorse can set in with the minority of Americans who supported the health care reform legislation, a Democrat Senator has “vote remorse”.

Gaggle via Hot Air:

A Democratic senator I can’t name, who reluctantly voted for the health-care bill out of loyalty to his party and his admiration for Barack Obama, privately complained to me that the measure was political folly, in part because of the way it goes into effect: some taxes first, most benefits later, and rate hikes by insurance companies in between…

…On the day the president signed into law the “fix-it” addendum to the massive health-care measure, two new polls show just how fearful and skeptical Americans are about the entire enterprise.  If the numbers stay where they are—and it’s not clear why they will change much between now and November—then the Democrats really are in danger of colossal losses at the polls.

Tea Party Rally Draws Thousands In Support of Washington State AG

In health care, Tea Party on March 28, 2010 at 1:03 pm

Tea Party crowd gathers in Olympia in support of Attorney General Rob McKenna (photo: South Sound Tea Party)

Washington State Tea Parties, on two day’s notice, drew thousands to the capital building in Olympia on Saturday to show support for Washington State Attorney General, Rob McKenna. According to South Sound Tea Party, Washington State Patrol personnel on scene estimate attendance at two to three thousand. Speakers at the rally included Washington State Senators Mike Carrell and Val Stevens, state Representative Tom Campbell, Washington 3rd District candidate David Castillo as well as McKenna himself.

McKenna, a Republican, has joined a group of fourteen state attorney’s general filing suit over unconstitutional insurance mandates in the Obama health care law. Washington State’s Democrat governor, Christine Gregoire, and Democrat state legislators have expressed vehement opposition to McKenna’s decision and have vowed to fight the move by restricting McKenna’s budget. In an interview with Seattle’s King 5 News, Gregoire states that “He did not call and consult me, I don’t know who he represents. He does not represent me.”

Blogger It’s Only Words has a take on Gregoire’s “I don’t know who he represents” statement:

The staggering arrogance of that statement leaves me (nearly) speechless and I assure you, I am rarely at a loss for words. I am wondering why Gregoire feels that the job of the Attorney General is specifically to represent her personal interests?

Gregoire, having been elected to three terms as Washington State’s attorney general before running for governor in 2004, should have no confusion as to who the attorney general represents. It was during her less than illustrious tenure as AG that the people of Washington State lost over $40 million dollars in two separate lawsuits due to missed deadlines, botched jury instructions and mismanagement of her department.

Does Nancy Pelosi Weigh More Than a Duck?

In Humor on March 26, 2010 at 12:07 pm

From NONSENSIBLE SHOES:

Pelosi witchcraft. It’s frightening.  Seriously, how do you think she managed to get health care through that chamber not once, but twice? She has supernatural powers to compensate for her, uh, beauty.

I don’t know whether or not Nancy Pelosi is a witch or whether it was witchcraft that she used to ram health care through the House. Apparently there’s a surefire way to tell. Scientific analysis and detailed instructions in the video:

This Just In: Paul Krugman is Still an Ass

In health care, Tea Party on March 26, 2010 at 10:12 am

New York Times– Paul Krugman:

I admit it: I had fun watching right-wingers go wild as health reform finally became law. But a few days later, it doesn’t seem quite as entertaining — and not just because of the wave of vandalism and threats aimed at Democratic lawmakers. For if you care about America’s future, you can’t be happy as extremists take full control of one of our two great political parties.

In a sense, Paul Krugman is right. One cannot be happy as extremists take full control of one of our two great (here I agree only if by “great” he means “large”) political parties. Where I disagree is on Krugman’s characterization of opponents to health care “reform” as extremists.

To correct Mr. Krugman’s misperception, this is an extremist:

William Ayers, unrepentant domestic terrorist.

This also is an extremist:

Rev. Jeremiah "God damn America" Wright

This is someone who associates with extremists:

"We're going to fundamentally change America"

This is an extremist who celebrates our move toward socialized medicine:

Fidel Castro, despot

We’ve been saying for years that it’s dangerous to see one of our two major parties aligning itself with extreme elements. The fact that Paul Krugman has not only just come to that conclusion and then points to the American public rather than the extreme elements in the Democrat party as an example is not surprising. Because, you know… he’s an ass.

GOP Identifies Flaws In Reconciliation Bill

In health care, Senate on March 25, 2010 at 8:12 am

From NYT:

With the Senate working through an all-night session on a package of changes to the Democrats’ sweeping health care legislation, Republicans early Thursday morning identified parliamentary problems with at least two provisions that will require the measure to be sent back to the House for yet another vote, once the Senate adopts it.

After spending the night shooting down Republican amendments to the bill (see here and here), the Democrat controlled Senate had hoped to have the reconciliation process complete and ready for the President’s signature by this morning. With revisions to the legislation now necessary, the changes will have to be sent back to the House for another vote.

Ed Morrissey on the strategy:

…the only effect will be to lengthen the debate on health care.  Obviously, that’s exactly what the Republicans want.  With 62% of voters wanting the GOP to keep fighting against ObamaCare, their leadership has no reason to let up.

In the end, the delay won’t be particularly significant. The House has no reason to challenge minor fixes and the primary legislation was already signed into law on Tuesday.

Leftist Spin: “Scott Brown Backfired”

In Congress, Elections, health care on March 24, 2010 at 3:30 pm

Scott Brown (R-MA)

The passage of Obama’s health bill in spite of the election of Scott Brown sends a message, but not the one Democrats want you to think.

In a special election last January, Massachusetts voters sent Scott Brown, a Republican, to fill the seat formerly occupied by the late Ted Kennedy’s wide posterior. Brown’s election, fueled by grass-roots support from the Tea Parties, thwarted the Democrat’s filibuster-proof majority in the Senate. Republicans knew that he was not the second coming of Ronald Reagan but he was, by God, a Republican butt in that seat.

Now, Democrats and the leftist media are taking up a new Rumpelstiltskin gloat in the wake of the passage of health insurance reform legislation. The left contends that conservatives are “having second thoughts” about Brown and that the right is disappointed in his election. One can see how the veracity of such a characterization might be… questionable, considering the source.

None the less, the Boston Herald has this:

“If he were a milk carton, he would be expired,” said Massachusetts Democratic Party chairman John Walsh

In fact, Democrats now say Brown’s election as the so-called “41st vote” to block Obama’s health-care overhaul inspired them to seek procedural means to bypass GOP efforts to derail the bill.

“Scott Brown’s election actually delivered health-care reform, because we didn’t need the 60 votes to make it happen. He delivered a significant victory in that,” Walsh said.

Ron Chusid, a repeat offending idiot at Liberal Values (a contradiction in terms if I ever heard one), asserts that “Besides falsely seeing his win as a victory for the far right, winning in Massachusetts led many Republicans to let down their guard, making it easier for the Democrats to pass health care reform.”

Despite the twisted logic that would lay blame at Scott Brown’s feet, the fact remains that his election caused Democrats to formulate a new plan to thwart the will of the American people. By taking away the cloture option, Brown caused Democrats to tip their hand, sending the message that there is no low to which they are unwilling to stoop in order to run rampant over the nation. As a result, “Deem and Pass”, reconciliation and the Stupak sell-out, not to mention Obamacare itself, are going to turn around and bite Democrats in the ass come November.

Cross posted at Conservative Firestorm

Next Steps After Obamacare Passage

In Congress, Economy, health care, House, Republican, Senate, Tea Party on March 22, 2010 at 12:52 pm

The United States House of Representatives, on March 21, 2010, passed the Senate’s health care reform legislation, sending it on to President Obama who will sign the bill into law. Those of you who have fought, argued, railed and protested against this legislation don’t need me to describe any further the unconstitutionality, erosion of freedom, fiscal irresponsibility and exponential expansion of government bureaucracy that this represents. Those who argued for the passage of this legislation will find out soon enough the truth behind the bill of goods you’ve been sold. Already the bond market has reacted unfavorably because, unlike politicians who lie about the  numbers, the numbers themselves don’t lie.

At the founding of our nation, the events that fomented revolution were strikingly similar to what we are experiencing today. While they bridled against them, the taxes that led to the Boston Tea Party weren’t the root of the issue with the colonists, the beef with Britain was that the taxes were levied without someone representing the interests of the colonists in Parliament; taxation without representation. The correlation between that and the passage of sweeping legislation against the will of a majority of Americans today ought to be obvious.

Heritage describes the “Intolerable Acts”, legislation enacted by the British Parliament in the wake of the Boston Tea Party.

The British government responded harshly by punishing Massachusetts— closing Boston Harbor, virtually dissolving the Massachusetts Charter, taking control of colonial courts and restricting town meetings, and allowing British troops to be quartered in any home or private building. Richard Henry Lee wrote that these laws were “a most wicked system for destroying the liberty of America.” The American colonists, outraged by these violations of their first principles, their basic rights and the rule of law itself, called them what they were: Intolerable Acts.

The contrast between colonial American society and modern American society is largely what has allowed this current debasement of our freedoms. It’s almost as if Aldous Huxley was a prophet.

Heartening is the knowledge that our founding patriots began as a small, fringe group from which the idea of liberty spread. Having laid that foundation for us, our work in restoring those liberties, while challenging, is somewhat easier. The notion of Freedom has not yet been lost in our society, though there is a cost to freedom as Doctor Zero reminds us:

Freedom is not a gift. It is not given to you by the government, in a precise dosage that can be adjusted to match a politician’s diagnosis of what ails the body politic. Your forefathers won an impossible Revolution against an invincible foe to declare the self-evident truth that your rights descend from your Creator. Whether that Creator is a transcendent God, or a random combination of genetic material in the primordial soup, it is a power that existed before the first king assumed his throne, or the first president was elected.

In paying that price, we will have to face our own shortcomings, our past laziness, political opportunism and shortsightedness:

Not once during that period [of Republican majority in 2006] did the party seriously attempt to reform the health-care cost structure, let alone through the use of market-based strategies now expounded by Paul Ryan, among others.  Why?  First, Republicans did attempt to reform Social Security in 2005 with market-based strategies and got demagogued by Democrats for making the effort.  But it wasn’t really that reason that kept the GOP from engaging on health-care reform.  That issue was widely seen as a Democratic strength, and Republicans didn’t want to engage heavily on their turf. – Ed Morrissey, Hot Air.

Drew at Ace of Spades lays out a battle plan in an open letter to Republicans:

You need to be the party of No for the next 6 months on just about every issue. The only issue (other than national security) that matters is repealing this monstrosity. I don’t know if it can be done but it has to be tried.

Please don’t let Obama drag you into a pissing match over the small stuff. If he has another idiotic jobs bill, just let it go. Vote no but don’t fight about it, reframe the fight in terms of health care. Reframe everything in terms of health care…immigration, taxes, Cap and Trade, whatever other crap they throw at you. It all comes down to health care and the fundamental shift in the relationship between the government and the people.

Repeal is indeed the word of the day. The trouble is that entitlement programs become rapidly entrenched in society, as evidenced by the inability to reform Medicare which we’ve known for years is on the verge of bankruptcy. The fact that the end of the line for Medicare’s feasibility is in sight and yet we’ve been unable to do more than delay the inevitable speaks volumes of the task we’ll have reversing this health care legislation. The Cato Institute lends a little perspective on this, taking a pessimistic view of Republican will:

Republicans will run this fall on a promise to repeal this deeply unpopular bill, and will likely reap the political advantages of that promise. But in reality there is little chance of their following through. Even if Republicans were to take both houses of Congress, they would still face a presidential veto and a Democratic filibuster.

But more important, once an entitlement is in place, it becomes virtually impossible to take away. The fact that Republicans have been criticizing Obamacare for cutting Medicare shows that they are not really willing to take the heat for cutting people’s benefits once they have them — no matter how unaffordable those benefits are. Paul Ryan put forth a serious plan for entitlement reform — and attracted just six co-sponsors at last count. Enough said.

I have to admit that such lack of follow-through concerns me, as well. For that reason, as I vet candidates for the mid-term election, commitment to repeal will be a crucial factor. If I don’t find that commitment I might actually join the vote out all incumbents crowd and begin beating the drum loudly.

NY Times Op-Ed Tells the Truth About Health Bill CBO Score

In Congress, health care on March 21, 2010 at 7:50 am

In other news, aliens have landed, President Obama has eschewed the teleprompter and everything east of the San Andreas Fault has fallen into the Atlantic Ocean…

As hard as it may be to believe, the New York Times somehow allowed an op-ed piece written by Douglas Holtz-Eakin, former head of the Congressional Budget Office, that tells the truth about the CBO’s analysis of the health reform bill before Congress today.

Holtz-Eakin confirms that the CBO functions like a calculator and makes no judgments as to feasibility. In other words “fantasy in/fantasy out”, as he puts it:

In reality, if you strip out all the gimmicks and budgetary games and rework the calculus, a wholly different picture emerges: The health care reform legislation would raise, not lower, federal deficits, by $562 billion.

Gimmick No. 1 is the way the bill front-loads revenues and backloads spending. That is, the taxes and fees it calls for are set to begin immediately, but its new subsidies would be deferred so that the first 10 years of revenue would be used to pay for only 6 years of spending…

…Finally, in perhaps the most amazing bit of unrealistic accounting, the legislation proposes to trim $463 billion from Medicare spending and use it to finance insurance subsidies. But Medicare is already bleeding red ink, and the health care bill has no reforms that would enable the program to operate more cheaply in the future. Instead, Congress is likely to continue to regularly override scheduled cuts in payments to Medicare doctors and other providers.

Removing the unrealistic annual Medicare savings ($463 billion) and the stolen annual revenues from Social Security and long-term care insurance ($123 billion), and adding in the annual spending that so far is not accounted for ($114 billion) quickly generates additional deficits of $562 billion in the first 10 years. And the nation would be on the hook for two more entitlement programs rapidly expanding as far as the eye can see.

The bottom line is that Congress would spend a lot more; steal funds from education, Social Security and long-term care to cover the gap; and promise that future Congresses will make up for it by taxing more and spending less.

Read the whole thing here.

Kill the Bill Status Update

In Abortion, health care, House on March 20, 2010 at 1:07 pm
President Obama addresses the House

President Obama Addresses the House

Here is a run-down of recent developments pertaining to health care legislation:

  • President Obama has just completed his final sales pitch before the House votes on health care reform tomorrow.
  • Stupak will not have his abortion language included in the House reconciliation bill. Either the Dems think that they have the votes without the Stupak 12 or the threats of revolt by the Pro-Choice Caucus were taken seriously.
  • “Deem and Pass” has been abandoned; we’ll have a straight up or down vote after all.

The House will vote tomorrow on the Senate health care bill and the House amendments separately since the “Deem and Pass” idea has been abandoned. Interestingly, it was suggested on C-Span that the House Parliamentarian may allow the house to vote on the amendments before voting on the Senate bill that they’re amending. I’m not sure how that’s going to work.

The latest whip count (depending on who you ask) puts the “noes” tantalizingly close at 214 but that may change if the House is allowed to vote on the amendments first.