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Archive for the ‘Republican’ Category

Conservative Cheerleader Syndrome

In Republican on February 28, 2011 at 10:29 am

Governor Chris Christie (R), NJ

Can we stop begging New Jersey Governor Chris Christie to run for President, please? I enjoyed his smack-down of union whiners as much as the next guy and I like his no-nonsense approach to dealing with detractors and confronting facts. But these do not comprise robust conservative credentials.

It’s high time conservatives stop cheering every politician with an “R” on their jersey and take a look at what team they’re playing for. Christie supports Cap and Trade, is soft on immigration and supported RINO Mike Castle in Delaware. Christie has run campaign ads supporting a ban on “assault weapons,” using the dishonest scare words “automatic weapons.” He’s a step above John McCain in that he’s able to take a stand without equivocating, but he’s sure as hell not the second coming of Reagan he’s made out to be.

Governor Christie has made a big deal of downplaying any talk of his running for president in 2012. So much so that it’s almost anti-downplaying. Christie has jokingly threatened suicide to prove that he’s not running in ’12, but his media machine, as noted by Dan Riehl, is in high gear.

If Christie kills himself and runs anyway on the Zombie ticket I predict he’ll split the vote with Obama. If Christie runs instead of killing himself I’m going to consider that his first broken campaign promise.

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Bullshit!

In Abortion, House, Republican on February 18, 2011 at 4:06 pm

House Republicans screwed the pooch today. I can’t even write about it. Click the link.

Um: Half of Republican Caucus, Especially Leadership and Old Guard, Votes With Democrats To Block Additional $22 Billion in Cuts.

 

The Only Fair Fight is the One You Win

In health care, House, Republican, Violent Rhetoric on February 15, 2011 at 12:03 pm

The only fair fight is the one you win.

Violent rhetoric. *Inclusion of this image should in no way be construed as endorsing the act of blowing opponents up with a tank.

So states rule #11 in the ubiquitous “20 rules for a firefight” endlessly circulated in emails and posted on (non-hippie) blogs. The effort to end Obama Care is, if you’ll pardon the violent rhetoric, undoubtedly a firefight. Unfortunately, the House Rules Committee is choosing to operate under a misguided notion of fairness. Maybe they didn’t get the email. Read the rest of this entry »

Dear G.O.P.

In Conservative, Republican, Tea Party on December 30, 2010 at 12:16 pm

Dear Republican Party,

If you nominate Mike Huckabee or Mitt Romney in 2012 I will officially disown you. I will disregard all warnings against supporting a third party. I will throw all the weight I have behind the most conservative, probably Libertarian, candidate that I can find and I’ll drag as many voters with me as I can muster. I can assure you that I won’t be the only one to do this.

If I may offer one bit of advice, it is this: Do not assume that the Tea Parties were your midterm lackeys, a mere stepping-stone in your re-ascent to power. It won’t work that way this time. You, as a party, will be accountable for the victory that we’ve handed you. Yes, we gave it to you. Do not squander the gift and the trust that it implies. You have had two years to gather your agenda items and we’ve made it clear what we want:

  • Repeal Obamacare
  • Allow interstate competition in health insurance
  • Tort reform
  • Secure borders
  • Enforce existing immigration laws

It’s best, dear G.O.P., that you consider 2011 and 2012 a probationary period. Behave accordingly.

Unable to Call the Plays, Clint Didier Sits on the Sideline and Pouts.

In Elections, Republican on September 15, 2010 at 7:44 am

Clint Didier

Clint Didier, the Republican third place finisher in Washington State’s “top two” primary offers “an open letter to all Republicans” in which he attempts to justify his petulant refusal to endorse #2 finisher, Republican Dino Rossi.

In a blue-state race that promises, under the best of circumstances, to be close, Didier has announced that his endorsement is conditional upon Rossi’s agreement to never, ever vote to raise taxes, never vote for a program that will increase Federal spending and to introduce Rep. Ron Paul’s “Sanctity of Life” bill in the Senate.

Didier is concerned that, if elected, Rossi will compromise and make deals for political favor. In order for Rossi to prove that he’s not the kind of politician who will do that, Didier wants him to, you know… make a deal for a political favor.

I’m all for electing to office citizens who are not career politicians or beltway insiders, but I do insist that they possess some intelligence. Didier is not one of those. Didier is a special kind of stupid.

Didier’s “open letter”

I want Patty Murray to lose in November as much as any Republican. That is exactly why I have chosen the course I have in making a conditional endorsement.

“I want Patty Murray to lose so I’m going to insist that the candidate running against her in a liberal state take a hard anti-abortion stance.” Okay, not following that logic.

Those more heavily involved in Republican Party politics know there are two camps within the GOP.  One camp is more concerned with fiscal issues, while the other believes in both social and fiscal causes.

Clint, those only cursorily involved in Republican Party politics know that there are two camps within the party and that there are even subsets of those. You’re not breaking new ground here.

We know that the ideal of limited government is rooted in our founders’ belief in individual liberty – which was the very reason for the birth of the GOP in the first place.  Yet, every time Republicans have been in control in recent decades, they’ve abandoned these ideals and left us with bigger government than Democrats.

Wait… Remind me which party you’re a part of again? Even if this were true (it’s not), it’s nothing compared to the size of government that we’ll end up with if Patty Murray and Obama get to continue unabated. We’re already looking at legions of new IRS agents to enforce health care provisions and a 1099 form for every flat screen TV sold at Wal-Mart.

I placed a phone call to Dino Rossi the night before my press conference offering him my endorsement upon his agreement to make a public commitment to honor [my wishes]. He refused.

Look, Clint… You got 12% of the primary vote. It’s a hell of a lot better than “Good Space Guy” managed but it’s not exactly “clout,” you know?

Under the Bush presidency and a Republican controlled congress, we saw the largest growth of spending in federal government and the biggest loss of personal freedom in our history.

No, when you say “largest growth of spending and biggest loss of personal freedom in our history” you’re thinking of Patty Murray, Obama and the Democrats. You know, the bailouts? Nationalization of private industry? The health care takeover? Try to keep up, buddy.

To all those who are saying I owe Mr. Rossi an open endorsement I say:  it’s time to ask Dino Rossi to either honor these simple platform planks or get out of the way for those who will.

The time for making those kinds of statements was leading up to the primary. We’re past that. Move on, buddy. Screw this up and we get Patty Murray who, and I can guarantee this, won’t honor any of your planks.

Ronald Reagan’s message to Clint Didier

The bottom line here, Clint, is that if you had studied your Reagan, you’d know how far off base you are with this stunt. Reagan addressed this very issue way back in 1977. Learn at the feet of the master:

You know, as I do, that most commentators make a distinction between [what] they call “social” conservatism and “economic” conservatism. The so-called social issues — law and order, abortion, busing, quota systems — are usually associated with blue-collar, ethnic and religious groups themselves traditionally associated with the Democratic Party. The economic issues — inflation, deficit spending and big government — are usually associated with Republican Party members and independents who concentrate their attention on economic matters.

Now I am willing to accept this view of two major kinds of conservatism — or, better still, two different conservative constituencies. But at the same time let me say that the old lines that once clearly divided these two kinds of conservatism are disappearing.

In fact, the time has come to see if it is possible to present a program of action based on political principle that can attract those interested in the so-called “social” issues and those interested in “economic” issues. In short, isn’t it possible to combine the two major segments of contemporary American conservatism into one politically effective whole?

…[Ideological purity] always conjures up in my mind a picture of a rigid, irrational clinging to abstract theory in the face of reality. We have to recognize that in this country “ideology” is a scare word. And for good reason. Marxist-Leninism is, to give but one example, an ideology. All the facts of the real world have to be fitted to the Procrustean bed of Marx and Lenin. If the facts don’t happen to fit the ideology, the facts are chopped off and discarded.I consider this to be the complete opposite to principled conservatism. If there is any political viewpoint in this world which is free from slavish adherence to abstraction, it is American conservatism.

This is not about you, Clint. It’s really not even about the Republican Party. It’s about what you and I owe to our grandchildren. We owe them our very best effort at reversing the course that Patty Murray has helped to set us on. You cannot do that by playing games with your supporter’s loyalties.

Delaware GOP Files FEC Complaint Against O’Donnell

In Republican, Senate, Tea Party on September 9, 2010 at 4:58 pm

Dirty, dirty pool by establishment Republican Mike Castle.

From Roll Call:

The Republican Party of Delaware has filed a formal complaint with the Federal Election Commission, accusing one of its own Senate candidates of illegally collaborating with the Tea Party Express.

Attorneys for the state party asked the FEC to launch an immediate and thorough investigation into conservative GOP candidate Christine O’Donnell “to remedy the alleged violations and to ensure that these violations immediately cease and do not reoccur,” according to the complaint filed Thursday.

O’Donnell, a solidly conservative Republican candidate in comparison to her opponent Mike Castle, is a favorite of Tea Party groups and was today endorsed by Sarah Palin. Castle, on the other hand, is a career politician who supports Cap and Trade and is widely considered a RINO.

The FEC complaint alleges that:

  • O’Donnell has knowingly accepted excessive contributions from the Tea Party Express that were directly solicited on behalf of the O’Donnell campaign, according to the filing.
  • O’Donnell has accepted illegal excessive contributions from the Tea Party Express by engaging in a statewide coordinated communications effort in support of her campaign. This means, according to the complaint, that every advertisement that is being run by the Tea Party Express in support of O’Donnell is a violation of federal law.

Federal Election Commission guidelines do not place limits on independent expenditures, which is where Tea Party Express’ ads in support of O’Donnell fall. The hitch in independent expenditures is that the efforts from an independent group cannot be coordinated with the candidate. At this point, there is no evidence that such coordination took place.

An FEC Spokesperson has stated that it is “highly unlikely” that this case can be expedited before the September 14 primary.

A Gathering on The Mall is Not Going to Change Government

In Conservative, Elections, Republican, Tea Party on September 8, 2010 at 11:22 am


As inspiring as the sight of hundreds of thousands of people gathered on the Washington Mall during the Restoring Honor rally is, and as inspiring as the gathering of even greater numbers during the 9/12 rally will be, neither of these can or will change anything in our government. In fact, President Obama “didn’t pay much attention” to the Restoring Honor rally.

That’s not to say that these rallies are unimportant. On the contrary, the gathering of people with a common purpose is hugely important in that it energizes both those who attend and those who observe. But what good is an energized battery if that charge isn’t used to do work?

Ron Robinson at RedState lays out five steps that will lead to real change and real hope. Neither of which can be handed to us by a popular leader. As it was with our founding, hope and change comes from getting off of our asses and taking control of our own governance from the ground up. That, my friends is grass-roots. To wit:

1. Get Out The Vote
Learn how to develop a functioning precinct organization in your neighborhood that can turn out the vote and educate your neighbors on crucial issues. This does not mean you walk the precinct by yourself. It means that you identify and use your willing neighbors to help you do it.  Take that walk in the sunshine.

Really  owning our precincts would mean that the votes that the Democrats purchased with big media buys for $10 million in 2008 would cost them $15 million in 2010 and $20 million in 2012 – to buy the same number of votes.   Once established a precinct operation neutralizes big money.   Elections can’t be bought in the media if the electorate is serviced (registration, permanent absentee ballot registration, knowing who’s turning 18 next month, etc.) and owned at the grassroots level.  A good precinct operation also neutralizes efforts at electoral fraud.

This will prepare you for the next Task.

2. Become a Precinct Committeeman
It’s different in every state, but you should endeavor to have a vote on your county party (GOP) Central Committee. In LA where I live, it’s called being a member of the Central Committee for the county. It means you have a vote in county party policy and officers. State party committee members are usually chosen from among the ranks of the county party officials. RNC committee members are usually chosen from among the ranks of the state parties. The only way to change the policy and direction of our party is to be involved in the governance of that party.  Read everything RedStater guru Cold Warrior has written on the topic.

Once you have been seated on your local county GOP committee, you will find that a lot of the seats around you are vacant.  Help fill them with your friends.  Most county bylaws allow for appointments to fill vacant seats and alternate appointments to allow for absences of the primary voting member (in LA, an alternate can vote if his/her primary is absent – my own current status until I am seated in my own right in Dec.).  Get one of these appointments if you have to!   The hard workers will be quickly identified and will be drafted upwards to work on the state party committee.  Starting to get the idea?  Get to work on it.  An online resource will be available soon to help you understand how to become a precinct committeeman in your own state.

This will prepare you for the next Task.

3.  Stay Beyond November
Our government is overwhelmed with deeply entrenched liberals because we went to sleep (or went on autopilot) for 40 years while the liberals took over.   What is the next election in your area after Nov 2, 2010?  Don’t know?  Proves my point.  The democrats know, and that’s why they are safely ensconced on every sewer commission, water commission, city council, and county commission in the country.  It’s why you and I tend to think of every government employee as a part of the liberal machine.  Because they are.  So we don’t get to hang it up in Nov and relax until 2012.  We need to use the precinct machine we built in Task 1 and the party connections we built in Task 2 to fill those small local offices with our people.  Then we change the government culture everywhere to conservative and genuine public servants.

This will prepare you for the next Task.

4.  Donate Often and Wisely
I’ve posted so little here lately because  I joined the staff of John Colbert, R candidate in CA for CD29 to toss out D incumbent Adam Schiff.  I have to answer emails from voters.  I’m getting a real education.  One voter wrote recently and wanted my candidate to change this and that (you fill it in, you already know…) about the GOP.  I wanted to hit him.  I thought, ‘you want a candidate who is trying to get everything he can from the party to get elected to change the party for you??!!??’  This voter threatened to withhold his contribution unless my candidate could promise changes in the party.

Well – that’s just the way to guarantee that the party never changes.

You should open your checkbook now to help assure that when my candidate is offered that ‘Young Guns’ money, he’s well-funded enough to turn it down!  That is how you start to change the party.  If the party has to come to the candidates for money instead of the other way around, the party will follow quickly.

In short, if you sit back and bitch about the country, if you sit on your butt and bitch about what’s become of the Republican Party then I have news for you:You are the problem. Knock it off.

Watson! Get In Here!

In Humor, Republican on September 7, 2010 at 10:42 pm

The only good phone is a dead phone.

I sometimes imagine that it’s 1875 and, for reasons unknown, I’m a trusted acquaintance of Alexander Graham Bell. I imagine that Bell turns to me and says, “I’m considering making a device that will transmit a person’s voice over wire in order to communicate over distance to another person. What say you to that idea?” My answer, of course is absolutely not! I hate talking on the phone.

In spite of my utter loathing of the device, I spent my evening volunteering at my County GOP headquarters’ phone bank. I sort of expected a little more fanfare from the staff but I guess they don’t understand the depth of my reticence.

Next Steps After Obamacare Passage

In Congress, Economy, health care, House, Republican, Senate, Tea Party on March 22, 2010 at 12:52 pm

The United States House of Representatives, on March 21, 2010, passed the Senate’s health care reform legislation, sending it on to President Obama who will sign the bill into law. Those of you who have fought, argued, railed and protested against this legislation don’t need me to describe any further the unconstitutionality, erosion of freedom, fiscal irresponsibility and exponential expansion of government bureaucracy that this represents. Those who argued for the passage of this legislation will find out soon enough the truth behind the bill of goods you’ve been sold. Already the bond market has reacted unfavorably because, unlike politicians who lie about the  numbers, the numbers themselves don’t lie.

At the founding of our nation, the events that fomented revolution were strikingly similar to what we are experiencing today. While they bridled against them, the taxes that led to the Boston Tea Party weren’t the root of the issue with the colonists, the beef with Britain was that the taxes were levied without someone representing the interests of the colonists in Parliament; taxation without representation. The correlation between that and the passage of sweeping legislation against the will of a majority of Americans today ought to be obvious.

Heritage describes the “Intolerable Acts”, legislation enacted by the British Parliament in the wake of the Boston Tea Party.

The British government responded harshly by punishing Massachusetts— closing Boston Harbor, virtually dissolving the Massachusetts Charter, taking control of colonial courts and restricting town meetings, and allowing British troops to be quartered in any home or private building. Richard Henry Lee wrote that these laws were “a most wicked system for destroying the liberty of America.” The American colonists, outraged by these violations of their first principles, their basic rights and the rule of law itself, called them what they were: Intolerable Acts.

The contrast between colonial American society and modern American society is largely what has allowed this current debasement of our freedoms. It’s almost as if Aldous Huxley was a prophet.

Heartening is the knowledge that our founding patriots began as a small, fringe group from which the idea of liberty spread. Having laid that foundation for us, our work in restoring those liberties, while challenging, is somewhat easier. The notion of Freedom has not yet been lost in our society, though there is a cost to freedom as Doctor Zero reminds us:

Freedom is not a gift. It is not given to you by the government, in a precise dosage that can be adjusted to match a politician’s diagnosis of what ails the body politic. Your forefathers won an impossible Revolution against an invincible foe to declare the self-evident truth that your rights descend from your Creator. Whether that Creator is a transcendent God, or a random combination of genetic material in the primordial soup, it is a power that existed before the first king assumed his throne, or the first president was elected.

In paying that price, we will have to face our own shortcomings, our past laziness, political opportunism and shortsightedness:

Not once during that period [of Republican majority in 2006] did the party seriously attempt to reform the health-care cost structure, let alone through the use of market-based strategies now expounded by Paul Ryan, among others.  Why?  First, Republicans did attempt to reform Social Security in 2005 with market-based strategies and got demagogued by Democrats for making the effort.  But it wasn’t really that reason that kept the GOP from engaging on health-care reform.  That issue was widely seen as a Democratic strength, and Republicans didn’t want to engage heavily on their turf. – Ed Morrissey, Hot Air.

Drew at Ace of Spades lays out a battle plan in an open letter to Republicans:

You need to be the party of No for the next 6 months on just about every issue. The only issue (other than national security) that matters is repealing this monstrosity. I don’t know if it can be done but it has to be tried.

Please don’t let Obama drag you into a pissing match over the small stuff. If he has another idiotic jobs bill, just let it go. Vote no but don’t fight about it, reframe the fight in terms of health care. Reframe everything in terms of health care…immigration, taxes, Cap and Trade, whatever other crap they throw at you. It all comes down to health care and the fundamental shift in the relationship between the government and the people.

Repeal is indeed the word of the day. The trouble is that entitlement programs become rapidly entrenched in society, as evidenced by the inability to reform Medicare which we’ve known for years is on the verge of bankruptcy. The fact that the end of the line for Medicare’s feasibility is in sight and yet we’ve been unable to do more than delay the inevitable speaks volumes of the task we’ll have reversing this health care legislation. The Cato Institute lends a little perspective on this, taking a pessimistic view of Republican will:

Republicans will run this fall on a promise to repeal this deeply unpopular bill, and will likely reap the political advantages of that promise. But in reality there is little chance of their following through. Even if Republicans were to take both houses of Congress, they would still face a presidential veto and a Democratic filibuster.

But more important, once an entitlement is in place, it becomes virtually impossible to take away. The fact that Republicans have been criticizing Obamacare for cutting Medicare shows that they are not really willing to take the heat for cutting people’s benefits once they have them — no matter how unaffordable those benefits are. Paul Ryan put forth a serious plan for entitlement reform — and attracted just six co-sponsors at last count. Enough said.

I have to admit that such lack of follow-through concerns me, as well. For that reason, as I vet candidates for the mid-term election, commitment to repeal will be a crucial factor. If I don’t find that commitment I might actually join the vote out all incumbents crowd and begin beating the drum loudly.

Senator Coburn Throws Down the Gauntlet on Health Care Vote

In health care, House, Republican on March 18, 2010 at 3:17 pm

H/T RealClearPolitics